Future Perfect Tense | English Grammar

Future Perfect Tense

FUTURE PERFECT TENSE

Introduction to Future Perfect Tense

Future perfect tense describes an action that will take place in the future but will end at a certain point. It also describes an action that will end after another action takes place.

 For example,

  • Ben will have cut the cake before nine o’clock.
  • Sam and Elijah will let the dogs out before evening.
  • The court will have given their decision before they provide them with the proof.
  • We will have reached our destination before the sun sets.
  • The plane will have landed at midnight tonight.

 

In all the examples above, the action will take place somewhere in the future and will end either at a specific time or before another action takes place.

Remember, the action that is described in the sentence must have a deadline. If there is no deadline in the sentence, use simple future tense instead.

For example,

  • Sarah will have read the book. (Incorrect)
  • Sarah will read the book. (Correct)

 

Past Participles of Verbs

We know that there basically are three forms of verb. The first form is the base form, the second form is the simple past and the third form is the past participle. How do we form a past participle? There is no hard and fast rule. It differs for irregular and regular verbs.

 • Regular verbs:

Past participles of irregular verbs can be formed by adding -ed, -d or -t to the base form of the verb. For example, the past participle of burn is burnt, cook is cooked, spoil is spoilt etc.

 • Irregular verbs

Past participles for irregular verbs are differently made. We do not just add -e, -d or -t to the base form. Past participles of irregular verbs need to be memorized. For example, the past participle of take is taken, shake is shaken, think is thought, break is broken etc.

Forming sentences in future perfect tense is quite easy if you are well acquainted with the past participle (3rd form) of verbs.

 

Forming sentences in Future Perfect Tense

In order to form sentences in future perfect tense, the following formats are followed.

 

How to form affirmative sentences in future perfect tense?

To make affirmative sentences in future perfect tense, we follow the following format.

Subject + will + have + Past Participle of verb + Object (if any)

For example,

Liam will have boarded the plane before everyone else tomorrow.

Ron will have sneaked out of the house before his father arrives.

We will have eaten our ice-cream before someone else will.

Kathy and Ella will have read the letter before it reaches the company.

 

How to form negative sentences in future perfect tense?

To make negative sentences in future perfect tense, we follow the following format.

Subject + will + not + have + Past Participle of verb + Object (if any)

For example,

Noah will not have eaten his lunch during the break.

We will not have seen the sunset if we do not speed up.

Elijah and Nick will not have studied hard before the final exams approach.

 

How to ask questions in the future perfect tense?

In order to ask questions in perfect future tense, we follow the following format.

Will + subject + have + past participle + object (if any)

For example,

Will Smith have reached the house before we do?

Will Laura have cooked the meal before they break their fast?

Will we have reached the museum before they put the statute down?

Will you have cleaned your room before me?

Will I have gotten up from bed when she comes over?

 

 

 

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